Rhonda Robinson

Rhonda Robinson
The Definition of Insanity – Coping with a Child’s Mental Illness
“His hands and feet were shackled. He was too young to drink or serve his country and barely old enough to drive, yet he was being charged as an adult for armed robbery. If convicted, he faced 3 years to life. “How did we get here? Where did I go wrong?” A mother screams as her son is hauled away. Crime affects everyone involved. It’s a heart breaking and shocking ordeal to have a child propelled into the snare of the prison system. It can be a devastating and challenging experience for parents. Their emotions can come in waves or, God forbid all at once. They often question their parenting skills and suffer with guilt, anger, shame, as well as the feeling of isolation. Although their children committed a crime, one thing is for sure, it does not stop their unconditional love from flowing through those prison doors. The author’s mentally ill son was incarcerated. At times, the shame, guilt and pain she felt was unbearable. Her memoir is a story about a mother’s love; a love with shortcomings and sometimes poor judgement. If the narrative of her journey can help at least one person along the way, it will be worth exposing her vulnerabilities. Through her desperation to find answers and advocate for her son, the author was inspired to create the organization called Mothers of Incarcerated Sons Society Inc. (M.I.S.S.) It is an online support group that helps families endure the anguish of having a loved-one incarcerated. At the end of the book there are tips and resources on how one might cope with their despair.
Ms. Robinson is the founder and director of a non-profit organization called Mothers of Incarcerated Sons Society, Inc. (M.I.S.S.) It is an online support group that help families endure the anguish of having a love-one incarcerated. The organization currently has over three-thousand members nationwide and in Europe. She also worked in the mental health and human services departments for the State of Michigan before retiring after twenty-one years of service.

It has been said that time heals all wounds. I don’t agree. The wounds remain. Time – the mind, protecting its sanity – covers them with some scar tissue and the pain lessens, but it is never gone. – Rose Kennedy