James Ware

James Ware
James Ware
Making Meetings Matter: How Smart Leaders Orchestrate Powerful Conversations in the Digital Age
Are you stuck in the unproductive meeting trap?

It is common to feel that corporate meetings are a waste of time. Time that could be better spent getting “real work” done. But it doesn’t have to be this way. This book is dedicated to the proposition that meetings can be meaningful, productive, and even fun—all at the same time.

We need to bring business meetings into the digital age in the same way that we have reinvented business planning and written communication. The current form of corporate meetings is bent and broken; it just doesn’t fit the realities of the global, technology-rich world that we live in today.

This book is all about reinventing the business meeting. It offers advice and guidance for streamlining and strengthening all kinds of corporate conversations; but it focuses where it should, on the formal meetings that fill up over 50 percent of most managers’ calendars.
James P. Ware
Jim Ware, PhD, is a meeting design strategist. A former Harvard Business School professor, he has focused his entire career on understanding what organizations must do to thrive in a rapidly changing world.

Jim is the founder and executive director of Making Meetings Matter, Inc., a research and advisory firm; and the global research director for Occupiers Journal Limited, publisher of Work & Place. He has co-authored several books about the digital economy and its implications for leadership and organizational performance. His most recent book is Making Meetings Matter: How Smart Leaders Orchestrate Powerful Conversations in the Digital Age.

Jim holds PhD, M.A., and B.Sc. degrees from Cornell University and an MBA (With Distinction) from the Harvard Business School. He lives and works in northern California.
Making Meetings Matter: How Smart Leaders Orchestrate Powerful Conversations in the Digital Age

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