“Start to” and “Decide to”: Are They Flooding Your Writing? by Barbara McNichol

When you look back at what you’ve written, take time to find how many times you start sentences with the word “start” or “begin.” For example, in a 5,000-word document I edited, those two words appeared 14 times, while only five were deemed necessary to the meaning. That’s a lot of extra words flooding your writing! "Start to" and "Decide to": Are They Flooding Your Writing? by Barbara McNichol

Whenever you write “start to” or “begin to,” question it. Ask: Is “start” or “begin” essential to the meaning of the sentence? Chances are you can glide straight to the action verb without it. So skip the “start/begin” part and employ the phrase Nike made famous: Just do it!

These examples show how you can write a stronger statement by going straight to the action verb rather than “beginning” to go for it concept.

Example 1: Slowly begin to approach your teammate with your idea.
Better: Slowly approach your teammate with your idea.

Example 2: Start to make an agenda for the meeting.
Better: Make an agenda for the meeting.

Same for “Decide To” Verbs

Similarly, watch out for “decide to” in your writing. Which verb carries more weight in this example sentence, “decide” or “launch”?

Example: The president decided to launch the company’s implementation strategy next month.

Better: The president will launch the company’s implementation strategy next month.

Do you see how “decide” doesn’t add meaning while “launch” is vital to the message? Again, when you catch yourself writing “decide,” ask: Is it needed as the primary verb? Does it add to the meaning of the sentence?

Make crisp, clear messages your goal with everything you write.

Author Bio:

Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping authors add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource so you can quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. Details at www.WordTrippers.com

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