Tag: book futurist

What Do Your Readers Want? by Dan Poynter, the Book Futurist

What Do Your Readers Want? by Dan Poynter, the Book Futurist

In the mid-70s I met Milt Strong at a photocopy shop. He wrote and published about square  dancing and he did all the production himself. He would set his type with an IBM executive typewriter; the one that had the carbon ribbon. Then he would go to a copy shop to run off the pages. […]

Get a Model Book – Guest Post by Dan Poynter, the Book Futurist

Get a Model Book – Guest Post by Dan Poynter, the Book Futurist

Visit a bookstore and go to the section where your book is going to be. To find a book that appeals to you. Consider the cover: hardcover or soft. Check  the color of the paper. Do you like the way the pages are laid out? How about the size of the type and the way […]

Fiction versus Nonfiction – Guest Post by Dan Poynter, The Book Futurist

Fiction versus Nonfiction – Guest Post by Dan Poynter, The Book Futurist

Fiction is entertainment, it has to compete with all other forms of entertainment and activity. Not just other books but going sailing, taking your children to the zoo, and gardening. Nonfiction on the other hand is something that people buy to save time or money. Your book is a valuable short course to the subject. […]

Titling Your Book – Guest Post by Dan Poynter, the Book Futurist

Titling Your Book – Guest Post by Dan Poynter, the Book Futurist

Years ago Wendy Weiss came to one of my workshops in Santa Barbara. She had just finished a manuscript on cold calling. I asked her about the gender makeup of the audience she speaks to. She replied mostly women. Then I asked whether she liked to consult with men or women. She replied that she […]

When You Run Out of Speech Handouts – Guest Post by Dan Poynter, the Book Futurist

When You Run Out of Speech Handouts – Guest Post by Dan Poynter, the Book Futurist

Most seminars and workshops should be provided with a handout. Sometimes we are pleasantly surprised with a larger than expected turnout. And we run out of handouts. In order to serve the audience well, most speakers take business cards and then email the handout to those who did not get one in the class. Providing […]